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> Recent Kitty Labwork: I Can't Lose My Love, please help me!
kmariebanks
post Oct 8 2013, 08:25 PM
Post #1





Group: Pet Lovers
Posts: 18
Joined: 3-October 13
From: middletown, ohio
Member No.: 8,121



Hello everyone.
over these past 2 months I have noticed that my baby boy has been not feeling well. Besides being tormented by fleas -they were horrible this year- he was lethargic, anorexic ( went from 20 to 12 lbs quickly),had a change in his meow and purr and just seemed depressed. I also noticed him swallowing hard. We spent a whole day at the doctor getting numerous test done ( CBC, FeIV, U/A, Diabetes, etc) and he was found to be severely Anemic secondary to fleas. My baby is long haired and fleas are often a problem. even with using the medication from the vet. He only goes out the house at night but when I noticed him getting sick he wanted to be outside all day in the 100 degree weather. He had such a change in his behavior! hiding in closets and just not responding to his name.
Boots was placed on Amoxicillin for 28 days, given a steroid injection and dewomer shot. He was doing well for about 2 weeks when everything began happening again. this time I noticed that he hated to walk. he would just lay in one spot and stare out like he was in pain and would give the worst meow I ever heard when moved. My husband and I had to hand feed him and clean feces from his furr daily. he would use his box and just sleep in it, refusing to move. after returning to the dr. his xray came back fine, his RBC's were within normal limits with his hgb and hct improving as well. however his reticulocyte count was 0.0 and platelet count way above the 1100 range. his Dr said his body is doing all that it can to make new rbc but cant. She said these labs are common in bone cancer however she is just hoping he has a bone infection even with his wbc being normal. once again he received a steroid shot and dewomer and antibiotics. He was a new cat that first week! truly a turn around!!!
Tomorrow 10/9/13 will be the beginning of his 2nd week of doxycycline. He continues to jump on the bed, eat, and stay out of his hiding places however I am noticing his discomfort with breathing returning, the hard swallowing getting worse, and the look of pain in his eyes. I NEED HELP! if he does not improve the dr is telling me it is time to consider putting him down because it will most likely be bone cancer. I am not in denial but I can not accept this! I do not feel she is listening to me when I tell her about his breathing and change in purr/meow. has anyone ever seen labs like this with their animal? please help me! I am heart broken. my baby is my life. I can not live without him. I am having panic attacks at work, at home, driving....all I can do is cry. I don't know if I can make it without him.
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DannysMom
post Oct 8 2013, 08:51 PM
Post #2





Group: Pet Lovers
Posts: 1,113
Joined: 3-February 12
Member No.: 7,464



Dear kmariebanks, what a beautiful kitty boy you have! I am sorry that he is ill. I have not had a fur kid with those symptoms, but since your vet is not listening to you then you may want to get a second opinion or even take him to a specialist. You could probably also post something online. There are some sites where a vet will answer you, but I can't think of the names right now.


--------------------
Danny: March 4, 2001 - December 28, 2011
Tina: October 27, 1997 - April 28, 2012


To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die.
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DannysMom
post Oct 8 2013, 08:57 PM
Post #3





Group: Pet Lovers
Posts: 1,113
Joined: 3-February 12
Member No.: 7,464



I hope this helps.

From http://www.cat-health-guide.org/feline-bone-cancer.html

Feline bone cancer is one of the more common types of cancer in cats, and osteosarcoma is the most common kind of feline bone cancer. It is a tumor that often affects the long bones. It is a very aggressive tumor that causes lysis (disintegration of the bone), bone production, or both. There may also be some soft issue involvement. The disease does advance slower in cats than dogs. Also, recent advances in chemotherapy in humans could show promise for cats.
Bone Cancer in Cat Symptoms

Symptoms of bone cancer in cats can mimic those of arthritis, and include stiffness, limping, and pain. Because of the rapid nature of the disease, it is important to seek treatment early. Unfortunately, symptoms often do not arise until the condition is already advanced.

Feline bone cancer is most common in older cats, ten years of age or older. It can, however, occur in younger cats.
Feline Bone Cancer Diagnosis

If your cat has symptoms of bone cancer feline, your vet will take x-rays. Tumors will show up on the x-rays. A biopsy will be necessary to confirm the diagnosis. In this test, a small piece of the affected bone is removed and tested for cancer.

Your vet will also take x-rays of your catís chest and abdomen, to see if the cancer has spread to the lungs or the liver. This is important to know because it will make a difference in terms of treatment.
Feline Bone Cancer Treatment

Surgery plus chemotherapy is often the recommended treatment for bone cancer in cats. The affected limb may need to be amputated, or a procedure called limb sparing may be attempted. In this procedure, the affected segment of bone is removed and an allograft (a graft of tissue from a donor of the same species) is then inserted.

Chemotherapy is used to prevent or treat cancer that has metastasized (spread) to other parts of the body. Obviously, treatment is most successful if the cancer is caught before it has spread and if it can be completely removed by surgery.

Radiation is often performed as well, particularly following limb sparing surgery. It is used to control the cancer locally. It is also a good way to treat cancer that cannot be totally excised.

While undergoing treatment for bone cancer, your cat may be experiencing pain. This can and should be treated with pain medication. Other symptoms, such as nausea, may result from chemotherapy. This can also be treated with medication.

Treatment has a good chance of being successful if the tumor can be completely excised. If not, the catís life can be prolonged and the quality of life can be improved by treatment. The median survival rate for cats with osteosarcoma is two years, but many cats live much longer.

There has also been some promising clinical results from some herbal ingredients that can contribute to the overall health of your cat. One product that is worth researching and discussion with your veterinarian is PetAlive C-Caps formula for prevention and treatment of cancer.


--------------------
Danny: March 4, 2001 - December 28, 2011
Tina: October 27, 1997 - April 28, 2012


To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die.
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moon_beam
post Oct 9 2013, 11:02 AM
Post #4


Forum Moderator


Group: Moderators
Posts: 8,014
Joined: 20-July 08
From: Virginia
Member No.: 4,861



Hi, kmarie, please permit me to add my sincerest empathy to you and your precious Boots during this time of his medical crisis. I wish to add my support to DannysMom's suggestion that you have the right to seek a second opinion. Whatever the long-term outcome will be for your precious Boots, at the very least you will have the comfort in your heart knowing that you have done everything in your power to give your precious companion a happy and healthy earthly journey.

As DannysMom has so comfortingly shared with you, unfortunately our precious companions have inherited a genetic trait from their wild cousins that causes them to do everything in their power to hide / disguise how they are feeling when they begin to feel ill or have an injury until they can no longer do it. By the time they begin to exhibit outward symptoms sometimes the nature of the illness / injury has already taken a toll on their physical body. Sometimes veterinary medicine can intervene and restore a good quality of life for our precious companions, and sadly there are other times when the only thing we can do is to ease our precious companion's transition journey by releasing them from their failing, frail physical bodies.

KMarie, you cannot make an "informed decision" unless you know what is going on with your precious Boots. I highly recommend you seek a second opinion. While the worst case scenario may turn out to be the proper diagnosis at least you will know what decisions you need to make.

Please let me try to reassure you that what you are feeling as you share with us: "I am heart broken. my baby is my life. I can not live without him. I am having panic attacks at work, at home, driving....all I can do is cry. I don't know if I can make it without him" - - is very normal. Your precious Boots is not feeling well and as his loving, devoted caregiver you do not want him to suffer for any reason. Please know you are not alone in this time of crisis, kmarie - - you are among friends here who truly do understand what you are going through, and we are here for you for as long and as often as you need us.

KMarie, thank you so much for sharing your precious Boots with us. He is so stunning, and from the look in his eyes and on his face he knows he is loved. Please know you and your precious Boots are in my thoughts and prayers, kmarie, and please let us know how your precious boy, and you, are doing.

Peace and blessings,
moon_beam


--------------------
In heaven's perfect garden there is no grief or pain, and all of God's creation join the angels' sweet refrain.

The most blessed way I have of knowing God's comforting love and grace is to look into the eyes and heart of God's creatures' sweet angelic face.
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kmariebanks
post Oct 9 2013, 09:07 PM
Post #5





Group: Pet Lovers
Posts: 18
Joined: 3-October 13
From: middletown, ohio
Member No.: 8,121



Thank you so much for your support and kind words. If our next visit does not go well then I will look for a new Dr for a second opinion. I am not in denial of my baby being sick...I just want to make sure I do all that I can before I have to make the horrible choice to put him down. At this moment the 2 of us are on the porch relaxing following our nightly routine. Thank you so much!
QUOTE (DannysMom @ Oct 8 2013, 09:51 PM) *
Dear kmariebanks, what a beautiful kitty boy you have! I am sorry that he is ill. I have not had a fur kid with those symptoms, but since your vet is not listening to you then you may want to get a second opinion or even take him to a specialist. You could probably also post something online. There are some sites where a vet will answer you, but I can't think of the names right now.

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kmariebanks
post Oct 9 2013, 09:11 PM
Post #6





Group: Pet Lovers
Posts: 18
Joined: 3-October 13
From: middletown, ohio
Member No.: 8,121



Thank you so much for your support and information. His xrays did not show anything so far so fingers crossed it is not cancer. prayerfully his next lab results will be much better. I will keep everyone posted.
QUOTE (DannysMom @ Oct 8 2013, 09:57 PM) *
I hope this helps.

From http://www.cat-health-guide.org/feline-bone-cancer.html

Feline bone cancer is one of the more common types of cancer in cats, and osteosarcoma is the most common kind of feline bone cancer. It is a tumor that often affects the long bones. It is a very aggressive tumor that causes lysis (disintegration of the bone), bone production, or both. There may also be some soft issue involvement. The disease does advance slower in cats than dogs. Also, recent advances in chemotherapy in humans could show promise for cats.
Bone Cancer in Cat Symptoms

Symptoms of bone cancer in cats can mimic those of arthritis, and include stiffness, limping, and pain. Because of the rapid nature of the disease, it is important to seek treatment early. Unfortunately, symptoms often do not arise until the condition is already advanced.

Feline bone cancer is most common in older cats, ten years of age or older. It can, however, occur in younger cats.
Feline Bone Cancer Diagnosis

If your cat has symptoms of bone cancer feline, your vet will take x-rays. Tumors will show up on the x-rays. A biopsy will be necessary to confirm the diagnosis. In this test, a small piece of the affected bone is removed and tested for cancer.

Your vet will also take x-rays of your catís chest and abdomen, to see if the cancer has spread to the lungs or the liver. This is important to know because it will make a difference in terms of treatment.
Feline Bone Cancer Treatment

Surgery plus chemotherapy is often the recommended treatment for bone cancer in cats. The affected limb may need to be amputated, or a procedure called limb sparing may be attempted. In this procedure, the affected segment of bone is removed and an allograft (a graft of tissue from a donor of the same species) is then inserted.

Chemotherapy is used to prevent or treat cancer that has metastasized (spread) to other parts of the body. Obviously, treatment is most successful if the cancer is caught before it has spread and if it can be completely removed by surgery.

Radiation is often performed as well, particularly following limb sparing surgery. It is used to control the cancer locally. It is also a good way to treat cancer that cannot be totally excised.

While undergoing treatment for bone cancer, your cat may be experiencing pain. This can and should be treated with pain medication. Other symptoms, such as nausea, may result from chemotherapy. This can also be treated with medication.

Treatment has a good chance of being successful if the tumor can be completely excised. If not, the catís life can be prolonged and the quality of life can be improved by treatment. The median survival rate for cats with osteosarcoma is two years, but many cats live much longer.

There has also been some promising clinical results from some herbal ingredients that can contribute to the overall health of your cat. One product that is worth researching and discussion with your veterinarian is PetAlive C-Caps formula for prevention and treatment of cancer.

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kmariebanks
post Oct 9 2013, 09:19 PM
Post #7





Group: Pet Lovers
Posts: 18
Joined: 3-October 13
From: middletown, ohio
Member No.: 8,121



Thank you thank you thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! your words brought me so much comfort!!! As Boots and I sit here on the porch in our favorite chairs it makes me just want to fight harder to save him. We spent our day today snuggled up and snoring together lol these are the days I live for. I take care of sick people daily however I do not have the strength to endure at home. I pray a lot and I am praying for the strength to stay strong for my baby. Boots is very loved by his cat daddy and I so that is the one thing that gives me comfort. when I am not strong enough to give him his medicine my husband steps in and takes care of us both. I tell Boots I need him daily and need him to fight for mommy. my little guy is tough! I hope he knows that I am doing all that I can to help him. once again we thank you! I promise to keep everyone posted. love from ke & Boots smile.gif
QUOTE (moon_beam @ Oct 9 2013, 12:02 PM) *
Hi, kmarie, please permit me to add my sincerest empathy to you and your precious Boots during this time of his medical crisis. I wish to add my support to DannysMom's suggestion that you have the right to seek a second opinion. Whatever the long-term outcome will be for your precious Boots, at the very least you will have the comfort in your heart knowing that you have done everything in your power to give your precious companion a happy and healthy earthly journey.

As DannysMom has so comfortingly shared with you, unfortunately our precious companions have inherited a genetic trait from their wild cousins that causes them to do everything in their power to hide / disguise how they are feeling when they begin to feel ill or have an injury until they can no longer do it. By the time they begin to exhibit outward symptoms sometimes the nature of the illness / injury has already taken a toll on their physical body. Sometimes veterinary medicine can intervene and restore a good quality of life for our precious companions, and sadly there are other times when the only thing we can do is to ease our precious companion's transition journey by releasing them from their failing, frail physical bodies.

KMarie, you cannot make an "informed decision" unless you know what is going on with your precious Boots. I highly recommend you seek a second opinion. While the worst case scenario may turn out to be the proper diagnosis at least you will know what decisions you need to make.

Please let me try to reassure you that what you are feeling as you share with us: "I am heart broken. my baby is my life. I can not live without him. I am having panic attacks at work, at home, driving....all I can do is cry. I don't know if I can make it without him" - - is very normal. Your precious Boots is not feeling well and as his loving, devoted caregiver you do not want him to suffer for any reason. Please know you are not alone in this time of crisis, kmarie - - you are among friends here who truly do understand what you are going through, and we are here for you for as long and as often as you need us.

KMarie, thank you so much for sharing your precious Boots with us. He is so stunning, and from the look in his eyes and on his face he knows he is loved. Please know you and your precious Boots are in my thoughts and prayers, kmarie, and please let us know how your precious boy, and you, are doing.

Peace and blessings,
moon_beam

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moon_beam
post Oct 10 2013, 10:42 AM
Post #8


Forum Moderator


Group: Moderators
Posts: 8,014
Joined: 20-July 08
From: Virginia
Member No.: 4,861



Hi, kmarie, thank you so much for sharing with us how you and your precious boots and your husband are doing. As it can happen with our human bodies when we get an infection that just does not seem to want to quit, so it can happen with our precious companions. Sometimes it takes a series of antibiotic regimens for the medication to take effect. The most important thing is that you follow what your caregiver intuition is telling you about your precious Boots - - for YOU and your husband are the ones who know him the best - - and if your intuition is telling you that he is not steadily improving - - or is having good days followed by not feeling well - - then you must follow through with whatever action you and your husband knows is the best for your precious Boots.

I hope today is treating you, your precious Boots, and your husband kindly, kmarie, and that each of you will have a peaceful evening together. Please know you, your precious Boots, and your husband are in my thoughts and prayers, and please let us know how your precious boy, and you and your husband, are doing.

Peace and blessings,
moon_beam


--------------------
In heaven's perfect garden there is no grief or pain, and all of God's creation join the angels' sweet refrain.

The most blessed way I have of knowing God's comforting love and grace is to look into the eyes and heart of God's creatures' sweet angelic face.
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